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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
at home! >> that future is out there! it is waiting for us! >> tonight, a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next generation so says james free man clarke. while all the world focuses on the election results, e we want to raise this question: where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth, and where is it going? the challenge for the next administration are both immediate and deep. no great country has sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with the fiscal cliff, partisan gridlock has prevented us from making the hard decisions about where we need to spend and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequality. while we remain the richest country in the world, the global economic order is rebalancing. the application of american power is changing as we have seen in the response to the arab spring. old alliances need redefining. the pivot to the east demands understanding between china and the united states and the realization that it is
this program on dvd, visit shoppbs.org or call us at 1-800-play-pbs. ♪ captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org we are pbs. man: we will see why tornadoes form. man: my first reaction when i saw this mummy was, "oh, my god, it's a pharaoh." man: it is the key to curing disease. man: well, that's history right there. >> rose: welcome to the program. tonight we rebroadcast a program that was presented on election night but because of the lateness of the hour many people didn't see it. it is about america's future, not with standing who the president is. joining me are tom brocaw, ally gutmann, david brooks and jon meacham. >> they have to taker it out of column a and say some seizure are right and some of the issues on education and inequity are right and i'm going to take it out of both sides and that will just confuse everybody. but more people in the country between the tweeting and blogging would say interesting. >> rose: america and its future, the america moment when we continue. fv captioning sponsored by rose communications >> right here at home. >> that future is out th
here at home. >> that future is out there waiting for us. >> ro: a policihks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global health and science. science and technology are ging us
that it's not -- it hasn't been part of the conversation and all of us, the voters, particularly in states that are not deep red or deep blue have a certain obligation to give their lawmakers the room to cast a couple of votes that might get them-- many my favorite washington verb-- primaried. when you talk to these guys, when the cameras are away, they say the real problem here is not so much the general election it's that if we vote vote with the other side on a couple of big things which is what a fiscal deal is going to require then we're going to get hit by people who think we aren't pure enough so we are punishing compromise at just the moment we need. the middle way is not always the right way, but sometimes it is. >> we are punishing compromise, but we also need leaders in congress who will be courageous enough, have the debts as well as the -- the depth as well as the stamina to really make a difference. what we didn't say is that the president's going to have to do right after the election is is he's going to have to staredown congress and especially his own party. you cater to y
broadwell all of this access. all of us had access to general petraeus over the years when he wants us around and tell us something. but this was different. he really allowed her to go everywhere with him. he talked to her all the time. i've talked to many aides, they were concerned about it in afghanistan. they were concerned how it looked, the optics of having this woman all the time. they described her as gushy and inapoprie tkingbout his thoughts. you've seen her on several programs over the last week. and things she was saying about him. that made them uncomfortable. >> well like martha, i've known him for about a decade, covered him in these war jones. he's a disciplined man, a man with incredible force of will. as much as we talk about his counterinsurgency doctrine, when i think about what happened in iraq, it was really david trae' will pow inhat battle space in the way he changed people's expectations what was possible, what was striking. so to see a man of that intensity get involved with another very intense person paula broadwell, i'm surprised by the lack of discipline. y
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
for us, it's about what can be done by us to the hard and frustrating but necessary work of self-government. that's the principle we were founded on. >> rose: many saw this election as a choice between starkly different visions of america, particularly the role of government and how to fix the economy. throughout the campaign, president obama emphasized the need for balancing individualism with collective values. in doing so, he echoed the language of the new deal as franklin delano roosevelt once said "in our personal ambitions we're individualalists but in seeking political progress as a nation we all go up or else all go down as one people." its remains to be seen whetr the country can heal the wounds in the shadow of the fiscal cliff. we watch as president obama seeks to make good on his promises in a second term. joining me from chicago is bill daley. he served as white house chief of staff from january 2011 to january 2012. in february he was appointed as a co-chair of the president's reelection campaign. so my question first is about the politics of this election. how do y
us of the controversy that ensued after the president came out, after the vice president came out and really put him in a position where he either had to declare himself in favor-- because before that, he had said, "well, i really don't-- i'm not there yet. i'm not there yet" on the question-- >> ifill: evolving. >> woodruff: i'm evolving. but then after vice president joe biden said that he was absolutely in favor of gay marriage, the president a few days later came out and said he, too. >> he did him a favor. >> the fact is, the president paid no political price, and, indeed, on the contrary, may very well have been materially aided by his position. >> ifill: michael, i'm curious, is there any-- how much change happens by who we elect as our leaders and how much of it happens through these ballot initiatives, through these referenda, where the voice of the people actually speaks directly to changing laws and changing minds. >> it's its interaction of both of those things with voters. 1978 it was proposition 13 in california, which had to do with reducing state services, and an e
, hari sreenivasan. >> thanks for joining us. tonight we are going to do something different. combining the resources of pbs's news and public affairs programs, we are going to look beyond election day and examine how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candidates' lives when they were young men. political journalists and authors will join gwen ifill on the "washington week" set to discuss how the presidency has transformed many of the men who have won it. and je
. >> rose: or if they're playing notre dame. >> well, i don't want us to play notre dame this year. >> rose: what makes you think he doesn't go to the office on saturday and sunday? >> i go to the office on saturday. >> rose: but what you do at the office and at home is the same thing. reading and on the phone. >> i'm reading and thinking and on the phone and talking to friends. there's very little difference in saturday and sunday from the weekdays. a little more action during the week, though. (laughs) >> rose: this reminds me of what surprised you most about him in terms of advice. you asked him what was the worst advice? >> well, we were doing a big action. he was going to be on the cover and so i -- without truly knowing the answer to the question i said all right, now, tell me what is the best advice you've ever gotten in your life from anyone? and he proceeded to talk for a long time about the worst advice that he had ever gotten. so i went back and told my managing editor this, which probably kind of -- with my head down in thinking well i hadn't come back with quite the right thing
. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college moved from an advantage they had to a democra
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)